Monday, May 9, 2016

Charlotte LOO LGBT ordinance fails in 2015.


Lavatory 100.

After a contentious meeting on Monday, Charlotte City Council voted down the most controversial ordinance it has considered in years, a nondiscrimination proposal that would have added sexual orientation and gender identity to protected categories.
After a contentious meeting on Monday, Charlotte City Council voted down the most controversial ordinance it has considered in years, a nondiscrimination proposal that would have added sexual orientation and gender identity to protected categories.
The measure failed 6-5, after a marathon meeting that featured hours of emotional debate and comments from supporters and opponents. Council members Michael Barnes, Kenny Smith, LaWana Mayfield, Ed Driggs, John Autry and Greg Phipps voted against it.
Before the final vote, council members had removed the section of the ordinance that would have allowed transgender people to use the bathroom of the gender they identify with. That issue drew the most vigorous opposition from dozens of speakers.
“All over the world, there are restrooms for men and restrooms for women,” said Driggs, a Republican. “It does not place an unreasonable burden on them and it does not stigmatize them.”
But even with the bathroom portion removed, council remained divided. Several council members had said they were opposed to removing that part, which would also have applied to locker rooms and showers, because it weakened the ordinance.
“I will not and I cannot support an amendment that does not protect all of our citizens,” said Mayfield, a Democrat.
Mayfield and Autry, also a Democrat, voted against removing the bathroom section, and both voted against the final bill because they couldn’t support a half measure.
The final vote against the bill brought together both supporters and opponents of the original measure. Smith, a Republican, said he believed the bill was motivated not by a desire to end discrimination but by a political agenda to “impose the progressive left’s new morality on our citizens.”
Autry said afterward that the fight wasn’t over.
“The struggle will have to continue,” he said. “Justice delayed is justice denied.”




Read more here: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/news/local/article11908907.html#storylink=cpy

Read more here: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/news/local/article11908907.html#storylink=cpy

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